Robber fly - Nature photographer Thomas Shahan specializes in amazing portraits of tiny insects. It isn't easy. Shahan says that this Robber Fly (Holcocephala fusca), for instance, is "skittish" and doesn't like its picture taken.

Eye-popping bug photos

Nature by Numbers (Video)

"The Greater Akashic System" – July 15, 2012 (Kryon Channelling by Lee Caroll) (Subjects: Lightworkers, Intent, To meet God, Past lives, Universe/Galaxy, Earth, Pleiadians, Souls Reincarnate, Invention: Measure Quantum state in 3D, Recalibrates, Multi-Dimensional/Divine, Akashic System to change to new system, Before religion changed the system, DNA, Old system react to Karma, New system react to intent now for next life, Animals (around humans) reincarnate again, This Animal want to come back to the same human, Akashic Inheritance, Reincarnate as Family, Other Planets, Global Unity … etc.)

Question: Dear Kryon: I live in Spain. I am sorry if I will ask you a question you might have already answered, but the translations of your books are very slow and I might not have gathered all information you have already given. I am quite concerned about abandoned animals. It seems that many people buy animals for their children and as soon as they grow, they set them out somewhere. Recently I had the occasion to see a small kitten in the middle of the street. I did not immediately react, since I could have stopped and taken it, without getting out of the car. So, I went on and at the first occasion I could turn, I went back to see if I could take the kitten, but it was to late, somebody had already killed it. This happened some month ago, but I still feel very sorry for that kitten. I just would like to know, what kind of entity are these animals and how does this fit in our world. Are these entities which choose this kind of life, like we do choose our kind of Human life? I see so many abandoned animals and every time I see one, my heart aches... I would like to know more about them.

Answer: Dear one, indeed the answer has been given, but let us give it again so you all understand. Animals are here on earth for three (3) reasons.

(1) The balance of biological life. . . the circle of energy that is needed for you to exist in what you call "nature."

(2) To be harvested. Yes, it's true. Many exist for your sustenance, and this is appropriate. It is a harmony between Human and animal, and always has. Remember the buffalo that willingly came into the indigenous tribes to be sacrificed when called? These are stories that you should examine again. The inappropriateness of today's culture is how these precious creatures are treated. Did you know that if there was an honoring ceremony at their death, they would nourish you better? Did you know that there is ceremony that could benefit all of humanity in this way. Perhaps it's time you saw it.

(3) To be loved and to love. For many cultures, animals serve as surrogate children, loved and taken care of. It gives Humans a chance to show compassion when they need it, and to have unconditional love when they need it. This is extremely important to many, and provides balance and centering for many.

Do animals know all this? At a basic level, they do. Not in the way you "know," but in a cellular awareness they understand that they are here in service to planet earth. If you honor them in all three instances, then balance will be the result. Your feelings about their treatment is important. Temper your reactions with the spiritual logic of their appropriateness and their service to humanity. Honor them in all three cases.

Dian Fossey's birthday celebrated with a Google doodle

Dian Fossey's birthday celebrated with a Google doodle
American zoologist played by Sigourney Weaver in the film Gorillas in the Mist would have been 82 on Thursday (16 January 2014)

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

German scientists seek way to end live chick shredding

Yahoo – AFP, Mathilde Richter, April 25, 2016

At Dresden's University Clinic, scientists are working to prevent mass culls of newborns
by detecting the sex of chicks before they hatch (AFP Photo/John Macdougall)

Dresden (Germany) (AFP) - In a basement of Dresden University, German scientists are busy refining a technique that could save millions of fluffy chicks from being shredded to death moments after they hatch.

The young hatchlings are usually condemned to a violent end simply because they are male, as roosters are deemed largely useless in the world of livestock farming.

Not only are they unable to lay eggs, their meat is not particularly popular.

Male chicks are therefore systematically eradicated. In many cases, they are mechanically shredded or crushed to death and used as animal feed.

At Dresden's University Clinic, analytical chemist Gerald Steiner and his team are working to prevent such mass culls of newborns by detecting the sex of chicks before they hatch.

Scientists use a spectroscopic method, based on the analysis of scattered light 
on blood vessels, to determine the sex of chick embryos in the egg (AFP Photo/
John Macdougall)

Steiner uses a spectroscopic method, based on the analysis of scattered light on blood vessels, to determine the sex of chick embryos in the egg.

Spectroscopy is already used in cancer treatment as it helps to differentiate between abnormal and healthy cells.

"If we are able to identify a tumour, then why not the sex?" said Roberta Galli, a physicist.

'95% accuracy'

Several teams of scientists -- including veterinarians, chemists, engineers and physicists -- are collaborating on the project, which also includes the participation of two private companies.

In the laboratory, Galli and her colleague Grit Preusse take eggs out of the refrigerator to demonstrate their technique.

Scientists use a spectroscopic method, based on the analysis of scattered light 
on blood vessels, to determine the sex of chick embryos in the egg (AFP Photo/
John Macdougall)

The eggs have already been incubated for three days and blood vessels had by now formed.

"But not the nerve cells, so they can't feel pain," Steiner explained.

The team believes that from an ethical point of view, it is preferable to decide the chick's fate before, rather than after, it hatches.

Using a laser beam, the scientists trace a small circle at the top of an egg, which makes a little hole in the shell. Through this they can see veins in the yolk, as well as detect the flutter of a tiny beating heart.

The egg is then placed in a large black box -- the spectrometer -- and quickly, the biochemical properties of the embryo's blood are displayed on a screen.

Eggs pictured after an incision by laser (L) and after a part of the shell is removed
to allow analysis by spectrometer (AFP Photo/John Macdougall)

"To the naked eye, we can't see the difference (between male and female embryos) but the computer can, if it's programmed to do so," said Steiner.

His team has been fine-tuning the programme over the past few years, and they now have it down to an identification accuracy rate of 95 percent.

In a process that should ultimately take just a few minutes, an egg containing a male chick is discarded pre-birth, while one containing a female chick is fixed up with a plaster and then returned to the incubator.

A few days later, a chick that will one day be a laying hen hatches.

Steiner believes that some use will eventually be found for the unwanted male embryos -- be it as fish feed or even in shampoo.

'Piling on pressure'

Beyond the challenge of finding a technique that is minimally invasive and which would allow the female "chicks to hatch and be in good health", another important factor is that the method has to have the potential to be automated, said Preusse.

An egg is placed on a Spectrometer at a lab 
at the Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine
 of the Dresden Institute of Technology 
(AFP Photo/John Macdougall)
The plan is to have a machine bore a hole in the egg, while another machine identifies the gender, fixes up the female eggs and removes the male ones.

A start-up in Dresden is currently working on developing the machines, which could one day be used by poultry farmers.

But one big question is -- when?

In Germany, the timing also has political resonance.

With a public that is increasing concerned about animal welfare, Agriculture Minister Christian Schmidt had promised that by 2017, male chicks would no longer be sent to be crushed.

At the same time, Schmidt is refusing to impose an outright ban, and is rather counting on Steiner's research -- which the ministry is funding -- to deliver.

"The politicians are piling on pressure ahead of the 2017 elections," said Steiner, who said he was getting phone calls "every week" from the ministry, eager for an update.

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