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Change (Peace, Love & Unity) is in the Air ... Time to GET IT !
You are ready for your Ascension? (Kryon Update: Apr 2014)

(Solar and Heliospheric Observatory - website / spaceweather.com)


A Litoria frog, which uses a loud ringing song to call for a mate, was discovered in a rainforest during a Conservation International (CI) led Rapid Assessment Program (RAP) expedition of Papua New Guinea's highlands wilderness in 2008 is pictured in this undated handout photo. REUTERS/Steve Richards/Conservation International/Handout


"The Greater Akashic System" – July 15, 2012 (Kryon Channelling by Lee Caroll) (Subjects: Lightworkers, Intent, To meet God, Past lives, Universe/Galaxy, Earth, Pleiadians, Souls Reincarnate, Invention: Measure Quantum state in 3D, Recalibrates, Multi-Dimensional/Divine, Akashic System to change to new system, Before religion changed the system, DNA, Old system react to Karma, New system react to intent now for next life, Animals (around humans) reincarnate again, This Animal want to come back to the same human, Akashic Inheritance, Reincarnate as Family, Other Planets, Global Unity … etc.)

Question: Dear Kryon: I live in Spain. I am sorry if I will ask you a question you might have already answered, but the translations of your books are very slow and I might not have gathered all information you have already given. I am quite concerned about abandoned animals. It seems that many people buy animals for their children and as soon as they grow, they set them out somewhere. Recently I had the occasion to see a small kitten in the middle of the street. I did not immediately react, since I could have stopped and taken it, without getting out of the car. So, I went on and at the first occasion I could turn, I went back to see if I could take the kitten, but it was to late, somebody had already killed it. This happened some month ago, but I still feel very sorry for that kitten. I just would like to know, what kind of entity are these animals and how does this fit in our world. Are these entities which choose this kind of life, like we do choose our kind of Human life? I see so many abandoned animals and every time I see one, my heart aches... I would like to know more about them.

Answer: Dear one, indeed the answer has been given, but let us give it again so you all understand. Animals are here on earth for three (3) reasons.

(1) The balance of biological life. . . the circle of energy that is needed for you to exist in what you call "nature."

(2) To be harvested. Yes, it's true. Many exist for your sustenance, and this is appropriate. It is a harmony between Human and animal, and always has. Remember the buffalo that willingly came into the indigenous tribes to be sacrificed when called? These are stories that you should examine again. The inappropriateness of today's culture is how these precious creatures are treated. Did you know that if there was an honoring ceremony at their death, they would nourish you better? Did you know that there is ceremony that could benefit all of humanity in this way. Perhaps it's time you saw it.

(3) To be loved and to love. For many cultures, animals serve as surrogate children, loved and taken care of. It gives Humans a chance to show compassion when they need it, and to have unconditional love when they need it. This is extremely important to many, and provides balance and centering for many.

Do animals know all this? At a basic level, they do. Not in the way you "know," but in a cellular awareness they understand that they are here in service to planet earth. If you honor them in all three instances, then balance will be the result. Your feelings about their treatment is important. Temper your reactions with the spiritual logic of their appropriateness and their service to humanity. Honor them in all three cases.

Dian Fossey's birthday celebrated with a Google doodle

Dian Fossey's birthday celebrated with a Google doodle
American zoologist played by Sigourney Weaver in the film Gorillas in the Mist would have been 82 on Thursday (16 January 2014)
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Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Aceh Police Arrest More Suspected Elephant Poachers

Jakarta Globe, Nurdin Hasan, Apr 16, 2014

In this handout photo taken on August 8, 2013
and eleased by World Wildlife Fund-Indonesia
on August 22, 2013, female elephant Ria, right,
walks next to her newborn in Tesso Nelo National
Park,Riau Province, Sumatra.(AFP Photo/
World Wildlife Fund-Indonesia)
Banda Aceh. Police in Aceh have arrested another six people for allegedly killing a Sumatran elephant for its tusks, bringing to 12 the number of suspected poachers nabbed in the case.

Adj. Sr. Comr. Faisal Rivai, the police chief in West Aceh district, said on Wednesday that the latest suspects were arrested on Tuesday in separate locations based on information from the six already in custody since Saturday.

He said the suspects, accused of killing a male elephant earlier this month, claimed they were not after the tusks initially.

“They confessed to killing the elephant because a herd of elephants had been destroying their crops,” Faisal told the Jakarta Globe.

He said it was only after the elephant was killed that they hacked off its tusks and sold it to a fence in Southwest Aceh district. Faisal said police had identified the suspected fence and were now looking for him.

Police on Tuesday announced that they had arrested six residents of Teupin Panah village in West Aceh for their alleged roles in killing the male elephant and two others, in Blangpidie in Southwest Aceh district and in Seumantok village in West Aceh.

They are accused of setting up booby traps to kill the endangered animals, then selling their tusks to the fence in Southwest Aceh.

One of those arrested on Tuesday, Hamdani, told reporters at the West Aceh Police headquarters that the ivory was not their main motivation for killing the elephant.

“Lots of residents have lost their crops to the herd of elephants. We’ve reported it many times to the authorities, but there’s never been any attempt to shoo away the elephants,” he said.

Police have charged all 12 suspects under the 1990 Natural Resources Conservation Law that could see them sentenced to up to 12 years in prison if convicted.

Genman Suhefti Hasibuan, the head of the Aceh Natural Resources Conservation Agency, or BKSDA, welcomed the arrest of the suspected poachers but warned of the potential for even more human-elephant conflicts in the province as the animals’ habitat was cleared for farmland.

“There needs to be a concerted effort from all sides — from the local authorities, the BKSDA and the residents — to resolve these human-elephant conflicts,” he told the Globe. “If we don’t do that, the conflicts will keep happening.”

Genman said his agency had recorded 20 incidents of elephants encroaching onto farms or villages in Aceh in the past three months, multiple times in some places.

Rare baby camel makes his debut at a zoo in Hungary

Yahoo – AFP, 15 April 2014

AFP - A one-week young camel, named Ilias, and its eight-year old mother,
Iris, are pictured in Budapest Zoo and Botanic Garden on April 15, 2014

A baby camel of the endangered wild Bactrian or Camelus bactrianus ferus species made a first appearance at Budapest Zoo on Tuesday, following its birth last week.

Baby Ilias, a male, was born on April 9, to its eight-year-old mother, Iris, whose maternal line has lived at the zoo for several generations.

Ilias -- whose father came from a zoo in Miskolc, a city in north-eastern Hungary -- was only presented to the media on Tuesday to give him time to bond with his mother, zookeepers said.

"When he was born there were problems, the baby was looking for milk from the mother, but as this was her first baby she had no experience," Zoltan Hanga, a spokesperson for Budapest Zoo told AFP.

"Us zookeepers had to hold down the mother and gently help the baby to feed."

Most wild Bactrian camels today are in fact domesticated.

A small group of around 800 to 900 live in the Gobi desert in Mongolia and China, but according to experts, are close to extinction.

Budapest Zoo was opened in 1866, and is one of the world's oldest zoos.

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

Loyal Dog Waits For Days Outside Hospital To Reunite With His Sick Owner

The Dodo, Stephen Messenger, 11 April 2014 

Lauri da Costa, a homeless man from the city of Passo Fundo, Brazil may not have much in the way of material possessions, but he is rich in other ways -- especially when it comes to the loyal companionship of his best friend, his dog.

On March 31, Lauri fell victim to a random assault during which a rock was thrown that struck him in the face. Injured, he then made his way to the local hospital to get treated, while his pet, a 4-year-old mutt named Seco, sat patiently out front.

But what was suppose to be a brief visit to the emergency room became an extended stay. Once there, physicians discovered that Lauri had melanoma on his face, and would need to be hospitalized as he awaited surgery to have it removed. Meanwhile, Seco kept vigil outside the hospital doors for his master to return.

As the days dragged on, staff took notice of the dog and made sure he had plenty of water and food as he waited. After the eighth day, even though Lauri was still recovering, doctors made an exception allowing the man and his loyal dog to be reunited early -- a touching scene captured on video.

Lauri still has some time left to recover before he's healthy enough to be discharged, but according to a local news station, Seco has returned to his post out front to greet him when he finally is.



Fur flies as US gets to grips with feral cats

Yahoo – AFP, Robert Macpherson, 14 April 2014

Cats are prepared to be spayed or neutered at the Washingon Human
 Society (WHS) Spay and Neuter Center, on April 6, 2014 (AFP Photo/
Mandel Ngan)

Cats are prepared to be spayed or neutered at the Washingon Human Society (WHS) Spay and Neuter Center, on April 6, 2014

Washington (AFP) - It's Friday night in Eckington, a quiet residential corner of Washington, and the back alley is crawling with feral cats -- rich pickings for seasoned cat-trapper Marty King.

"Here, kitty kitty kitty kitty," said King after setting four metal traps baited with flaked shrimp and fish cat food and lined with fresh newspapers.

Volunteer Marty King sets a trap for feral
 cats in a north-east Washington, DC,
neighborhood, on April 4, 2014 (AFP
Photo/Mandel Ngan)
"If they're hungry and they haven't seen traps before, they're not hard to catch," she explained.

"But some of them are very smart. There's a female I've been trying to get for a couple of years now and I haven't been able to get her yet."

Within 20 minutes, a young gray cat takes the bait -- and by Sunday lands on a veterinary operating table to be spayed or neutered under an ongoing program to bring Washington's feral cat population under control.

Coast to coast, the Humane Society of the United States estimates there are as many as 50 million feral cats, or "community cats" as their advocates prefer to call them. That compares to 95.6 million cats kept as pets.

For decades, standard procedure has been to round them up and euthanize them, but in recent years the trend has swung towards TNR -- trapping, then neutering, then returning cats to the places they were captured.

"Ultimately, our goal is to sterilize all outdoor cats and have them pass on through attrition," Scott Giacoppo, vice president for external affairs at the Washington Humane Society, told AFP.

"So if our plan or our goal happens, there won't be any feral cats."

Bird lovers disagree

Not everyone is convinced. Bird lovers in particular see a proliferation of homeless cats -- neutered, sterilized or otherwise -- posing a deadly threat to many avian species.

They cite a study from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and US Fish and Wildlife Service that estimated that "free-ranging domestic cats" kill a median of 2.4 billion birds and 12.3 billion mammals every year.

"Un-owned cats, as opposed to owned pets, cause the majority of this mortality," said the 2013 study, published in the scientific journal Nature, which called TNR "potentially harmful to wildlife populations."

The Centers for Disease Control has meanwhile asserted that "cats are more likely to be reported rabid in the United States" than dogs. Others say feral cats are potential carriers of infection and parasites.

Feral cats are prepared to be spayed or neutered at the Washington Human
 Society Spay and Neuter Center in Washington, DC, on April 6, 2014 (AFP
Photo/Mandel Ngan)

"The only sure way to simultaneously protect wildlife and people is to remove feral cats from the landscape," said the American Bird Conservancy in a petition sent in January to Interior Secretary Sally Jewell.

"It's certainly a hot-button issue," acknowledged Elizabeth Holtz, staff attorney for Alley Cat Allies, a Washington-based group that promotes TNR and rejects the oft-quoted Smithsonian study as "irresponsible and biased."

She cited the example of Jacksonville, Florida, which has seen "a huge decline in kittens entering their shelters and the number of cats they are euthanizing" since 2009 under a groundbreaking TNR scheme called Feral Freedom.

"Unfortunately, many communities in the United States still continue to trap and kill today, and those communities are not experiencing any change" in numbers of feral cats, Holtz told AFP.

Clipped ears

In Washington, every year, around 2,000 feral cats are trapped, sterilized, vaccinated and released -- with a clipped left ear to show for it -- under the Washington Humane Society's Cat Neighborhood Partnership Program, or CatNiPP.

The number has remained constant, something Giacoppo said might be due less to the cat population than to a growing number of volunteer trappers coming forward to help.

"It takes about five, maybe seven minutes for a female cat," said veterinarian Emily Swiniarski before 64 cats went under the knife one recent Sunday at the National Capital Area Spay and Neuter Center.

Feral cats run loose in a north-east
 Washington, DC, neighborhood, on
April 4, 2014 (AFP Photo/Mandel Ngan)
"For a male tomcat, it takes less than 30 seconds," she added matter-of-factly. "It becomes a real production line -- a lot of cats, coming and going, coming and going."

Many cats get treated at the same time for various ailments.

"We see a lot of wounds," Swiniarski told AFP. "Occasionally we see old broken limbs that have healed over time. Lately we've been seeing a lot of upper respiratory infections -- snotty noses, stuff coming from their eyes."

As cats awaiting surgery meowed gently in towel-covered cages, Giacoppo recalled coming across a 1930s law book that informed humane societies that "part of our job is to round up all the stray cats and kill them."

"We've been doing that for years and years and it doesn't work," he said.

"We can't get people to help us trap cats to kill them -- but we can get people to help us trap cats to sterilize them so they don't make any more babies."

Monday, April 14, 2014

Taiwanese Tourists Hurt in Japan Deer Rampage

Jakarta Globe - AFP, Apr 14, 2014

A sika deer window-shops on the Japanese island of Miyajima.
(JG Photo/Wikimedia Commons)

Tokyo. Visitors to one of usually-safe Japan’s most celebrated spots are being warned to be on the lookout, after two Taiwanese tourists were injured in a rampage by a wild deer.

The two, both 54-year-old women, took a tumble Sunday morning after being startled by the creature near the railway station in Nikko, an area known for its historic temples, a police spokesman said Monday.

The animal charged towards the pair before bolting into a nearby shop, where it smashed dozens of bottles and then ran off into nearby woods, the spokesman said.

“The tourist season will be in full swing soon,” he said. “We wanted to get the word out and tell people what happened.”

Nikko, alongside the capital Tokyo and the ancient city of Kyoto, is one of the most popular destinations for foreign tourists in Japan, a country where violent crime is rare and few visitors ever report falling victim to any kind of attack.

Agence France-Presse

Saturday, April 12, 2014

Police Arrest Shop Owner Trafficking Endangered Animal Parts

Jakarta Globe, Farouk Arnaz, Apr 12, 2014


Jakarta. The special crimes directorate of the National Police has closed down and arrested the owner of a Jakarta business trading in endangered-animal parts .

“The person is the owner of the ‘Golden Shop’ in Jalan Pluit Timur Raya, North Jakarta, with the initials L.W.,” deputy director of the National Police’s Special Economic Crime Unit Sr. Comr. Alex Mandalika said on Friday.

“He has been charged under the 1990 Law on Natural Resources and Ecosystem Conservation.”

L.W. faces up to five years in jail and a Rp 100 million ($9,000) fine.

L.W. is alleged to have sold highly prized shark fins, turtle shells and tobacco pipes made of ivory. Police also confiscated several tigers’ teeth and 27 smoking pipes made from ivory.

“They were sold expensively in rupiah and dollar denominations,” National Police spokesman Rikwanto said. “The owner also had online store at www.jakartagoldenkong.com.”

Related Article:


Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Sumatran Elephant Found Dead in Aceh Forest

Jakarta Globe, Nurdin Hasan, Apr 08, 2014

Listed as critically endangered, there are fewer than 3,000 Sumatran elephants
 remaining in the wild, according to the International Union for Conservation
of Nature. (AFP Photo/Chaideer Mahyuddin).

Banda Aceh. A male Sumatran elephant was found dead in the forest of Teuping Panah Village in West Aceh, allegedly killed for its ivory, officials said on Tuesday.

Head of Aceh’s Natural Resources Conservation Agency [BKSDA] Genman Suhefti Hasibuan said members of the agency, along with an elephant handler, had departed to the location to investigate..

“Based on reports from a local village chief, the elephant was said to have died a week ago,” Genman told the Jakarta Globe on Tuesday. “The team has had difficulty reaching the location, as there are still a herd of elephants [at the location]. We are bringing an elephant handler to drive away the herd.”

Many scientific reports have claimed that elephants engage in long mourning rituals for their dead, which could be the why the group of animals has remained at the supposed location. To get to the specific area, the team must take a 6-hour long trek into the jungle.

Genman said the agency cannot yet confirm how the elephant died, but according to an investigation conducted by local police and testimony from residents around the area, the elephant was murdered for its tusks.

“It was initially reported that two elephants were found dead, but the village chief insisted that there was only one,” he said. “We will know for sure once the team reaches the location.”

Meanwhile, a local villager claimed the elephant’s tusks were removed with a chainsaw.

“There was a trap around a tree,” said the resident, who declined to be identified. “We suspect ivory hunters put the trap there.”

Genman said that this was the province’s second recorded elephant death this year; an elephant was killed in February after it was caught in a hog trap set up by locals in Southeast Aceh.

“It was not meant to kill the elephant — there were hog pests in the plantation area,” he said.

Elephants living in Aceh have suffered in recent years. Increasing deforestation in the province has resulted in increasing habitat loss and more human and elephant conflicts. Even over the past three months, 20 cases of elephant-related disturbances have been recorded in Aceh.

“It takes a group effort involving all parties from the regional administration, BKSDA and local people to handle the conflicts. If not, the conflicts will continue,” Genman said.

Saturday, April 5, 2014

Police in Guangdong find another 'tiger slaughter' party

Want China Times, Staff Reporter 2014-04-05

A tiger is killed in Leizhou, Guangdong province. (Internet photo)

Butchering exotic animals for their meat, including tigers, has become a popular practice at galas held by wealthy residents of Leizhou county in Zhanjiang, Guangdong province.

Hosts often kill the animal while guests watch. In March, police in Leizhou discovered the butchering of a tiger, the tenth of the endangered animal to be slaughtered in the county in recent years, according to Guangzhou's Southern Daily.

An inside source said the tiger had been heavily anesthetized for transport to the venue. A distressing video tape of a similar slaughter in Leizhou two years ago showed a person first inserting a stick with a wired iron ingot attached to the end into the mouth of a tiger before starting a diesel oil-fueled generator and electrocuting the animal for 10 seconds. Still alive, the animal lay prostrate on the floor gasping for breath. A butcher then kills the animal for a reported fee of 1,000 yuan (US$160).

Insiders say that the slaughter of tigers has persisted in Leizhou for years despite the government ban, according to the paper. Tiger bones fetch 14,000 yuan (US$2,250) per kilogram, tiger meat fetches 1,000 yuan per kg, and tiger-bone liquor 1,000 yuan per kg. These items have already been pre-sold before the slaughter takes place, according to the paper.

With adult tigers weighing 150-200 kg and a purchase price of 200,000-300,000 yuan (US$32,000-$48,000), there is a profit margin of over 100,000 yuan (US$16,000). Tiger bones are used in traditional Chinese medicine and many businesspeople buy tiger meat or bone as gifts for government officials, despite a ban on the trade in tiger parts.

The tigers are reportedly supplied by breeders in Anhui and Henan provinces; there are no wild tigers in Leizhou, which as a peninsula used to be renowned for the large numbers of tigers roaming its wilderness.

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Singapore seizes ivory disguised as coffee berries

Yahoo – AFP, 3 April 2014

This handout photograph released by the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of
 Singapore on April 3, 2014 shows a collection of ivory seized by authorities
(AFP Photo/Agri-Food & Veterinary Authority)

This handout photograph released by the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore on April 3, 2014 shows a collection of ivory seized by authorities

Singapore (AFP) - Singapore authorities said Thursday they had intercepted about one tonne of ivory worth $1.6 million in a shipping container from Africa marked as carrying coffee berries.

The seizure was made in an export inspection station at the Pasir Panjang port on March 25 following a tip-off, Singapore Customs and the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA) said in a statement.

"The shipment, which was declared as coffee berries, was transiting through Singapore from Africa in a 20-foot (six-metre) container and destined for another Asian country," the statement said.

The shipment contained 106 pieces of raw ivory tusks weighing about one tonne, it said.

The statement did not mention if arrests had been made, but said investigations are ongoing.

International trade in ivory has been banned under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) since 1989.

Singapore, a major global port, is a signatory to the convention.

The statement urged shipping and logistics firms in Singapore to "exercise prudence" when accepting jobs from customers to avoid being implicated in illegal wildlife trafficking.

The ivory haul last week is the third largest by Singapore authorities since 2002.

In January last year, 1.8 tonnes of ivory from Africa was seized in the city-state, while six tonnes of raw ivory tusks and cut pieces were intercepted in 2002.

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

TNI Plans for Return Home as Riau Haze Under Control: BNPB

Jakarta Globe, Apr 01, 2014

An Indonesian motorbike rider dives on a hazy street in Pekanbaru, Riau
on March 14, 2014. (EPA Photo)

Jakarta. The number of hotspots detected in the troubled Indonesian province of Riau fell to zero over the weekend after forest fires burned intermittently for some two months, Indonesian officials said on Tuesday, as they announced plans to recall some 1,000 military personnel sent to combat the region’s annual haze-causing fires.

“The hotspots in Riau have continued to disappear,” National Disaster Mitigation Agency (BNPB) spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said in a press statement released on Tuesday. “On Sunday there were ZERO hotspots and from Monday to today there is only one more hotspot.”

The announcement was the first sign of hope since the forest fires re-emerged after a brief reprieve, surging to 777 hotspots by Friday and prompting stern action from local law enforcement. More than 100 people and one company, National Sago Prima — a subsidiary of Sampoerna Agro, have been implicated in this year’s forest fires to date. The fires, and the ensuing haze, have cost the province some Rp 10 trillion ($890 million)  in losses by the start of March, according to the state-run Antara News Agency.

While the haze from this year’s forest fires failed to reach neighboring Singapore and Malaysia in a significant way, air quality in Sumatra fell to hazardous levels, prompting the local government to declare a state of emergency as flights were diverted, more than 100,000 fell ill and three died, according to reports in local media.

The men, a villager named Muhammad Adli, 63, and a Surya Damai Agrindo plantation worker named Muslim, 30, were reported dead by the Indonesian news portal Okezone.com. According to the report, Aldi suffered fatal injuries after falling into burning peatland while Muslim died as he attempted to combat the forest fires as flames closed-in on the company’s plantations.

A third still unidentified man died of asthma-related symptoms, Sutopo told the Jakarta Globe. The elderly man was reportedly ill long before the fires began to burn, he said.

“The victim died due to old age and because he had been ill from the beginning,” Sutopo told the Jakarta Globe.

By Tuesday the conditions in Riau showed signs of returning to normal. The air quality was getting better and operations at Pekanbaru’s Sultan Syarif Kasim II International Airport have resumed normal operations.

“The air quality ranges from healthy to moderate on Tuesday,” Sutopo said. “There are no more [regions in Riau reporting] ‘unhealthy’ or ‘dangerous’ levels [of air pollutants].”

The government will now start to wind down its Integrated Operation Task Force — a 2,000-strong haze-reduction force that included members of the BNPB and the Indonesian Military (TNI). All members of the task force sent to Riau will be screened by health care officials before they return to regular rotation in Jakarta.

“The operations have been carried out well,” Sutopo said. “All the personnel involved in the operation went all-out… All the personnel will have their health conditions checked. They’ve been exposed to fires and haze for three weeks.”

Related Articles:



Illegal python skins feed hunger for fashionable handbags and shoes

Python farms could be the antidote to the $1bn-a-year black market in these fashionable and expensive skins

The GuardianSarah ButlerMonday 31 March 2014

The Python Conservation Partnership suggested python farms could be part
 of the solution to the problem of the black market in python skins. Photograph:
Image Broker/REX

Illegally traded python skins worth $1bn (£600m) are being imported into Europe every year as weak regulation fails to stop illicit traders capitalising on demand for the dramatically patterned leather.

Half a million skins are imported legally each year from south-east Asia, most of them destined for Italy, Germany and France, where they are made into designer handbags, shoes and belts.

Legal imports have grown from 350,000 skins valued at just €100m (£82.6m) in 2005 as Beyoncé, Johnny Depp's partner, Amber Heard, Khloé Kardashian and Tamara Ecclestone have jumped on the trend for the exotic handbags, which can sell for more than £4,000 each. But the black market in skins is thought to be worth about the same amount again, amid widespread circumventing of international agreements to limit the number of pythons taken from the wild. In its first report on how to improve the international trade and protect pythons, the Python Conservation Partnership, backed by the owner of Gucci – Kering – and the International Union for Conservation of Nature, said python farms could be part of the answer.

"This report offers [an] alternative solution to the sourcing of python skins for which demand is escalating. However, there is still some way to go towards more transparent, better-managed python farming," said Jean-Christophe Vié, deputy director of the International Union for Conservation of Nature's global species programme. "We must make sure that attention is not diverted from the urgent need to preserve wild pythons and their habitats through direct site conservation and action against illegal trade."

In the past, farming of south-east Asia's reticulated python (Python reticulatus) and Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus) – two of the world's largest snakes – had been dismissed as uneconomic because pythons were thought to take too long to mature and to be too difficult to feed and breed in captivity.

The report said commercial farms do exist in China, Vietnam and Thailand. It recommends this industry could be improved with the introduction of better monitoring, more humane slaughter techniques and the urgent development of technology such as DNA or isotope testing to help identify whether a skin is farmed or taken from the wild. Such tests could help prevent the "laundering" of illegally caught wild pythons through farms. That practice is thought to be so widespread that the report says that all supposedly farmed python skin from Laos, Cambodia, Indonesia and Malaysia should be treated with caution as there is little proof that farms exist in these countries.

Marie-Claire Daveu, chief sustainability officer at Kering, said that demand for python skin accessories was rising at Gucci, especially from Asia, and so it was keen to ensure a sustainable source of supply. "Our objective is to be sure that we don't put in danger these two species of python and their eco-system," she said.

The company currently buys farmed and wild-caught skins certified under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) scheme from Malaysia, Indonesia and Vietnam.

Daveu said that there needed to be a balance between ethically farmed pythons and the trade in wild python skins, which provided jobs for local communities that could support the protection of the reptiles in their own habitat. But she admitted: "Today there is no way to be fully sure where the skin has come from."

Monday, March 31, 2014

Police arrest rare animal smuggling suspects across China

Want China Times, Xinhua 2014-03-31

Police in China have recently arrested 24 people suspected of smuggling and selling products made from rare and endangered animals, including bear paws and pangolin body parts.

The Ministry of Public Security said in a statement on Friday that about 4,500 products have been confiscated in police raids across nine provinces.

The value of the animal products was estimated at more than 10 million yuan (US$1.6 million), it said, without specifying when the arrests and confiscations took place.

In July 2013, police in Nanjing, capital of east China's Jiangsu province, uncovered a local restaurant that was purchasing, transporting and selling rare and endangered animal species and products.

Led by the clue, police found two suspects, who were identified by their surname Deng and Li, smuggling rare animal products from overseas, which were then sold and stored in three places in Nanjing.

The products in Nanjing were then sold to Shanghai, and the provinces of Hebei, Shanxi, Jiangsu, Anhui, Shandong, Henan and Shaanxi.


A tiger is killed in Leizhou, Guangdong province. (Internet photo)

Related Article:

Writers and academics back pro-animal party's European election list

DutchNews.nl, Sunday 30 March 2014

The South African writer John M.
Coetzee (NOS/AFP)
Candidates for the pro-animal PvdD in the European parliamentary elections in May include South African writer and Nobel prize winner John M. Coetzee, the party said on its website at the weekend.

The PvdD has put together a string of writers, academics and philosophers to act as lijstduwer – a ceremonial position at the bottom of the list of formal candidates. Becoming a lijstduwer – literally list pusher – shows support for the party’s policies without taking a winnable position on the list.

Other foreigners who have stepped forward to close the list are American philosopher and animal rights campaigner Tom Regan and Canadian philosopher Will Kymlicka.

The party says Dutch voting law also allows people from outside the EU to stand for election, although the election council is still studying the plan.

The PvdD list also includes Dutch prize-winning authors Maarten Biesheuvel, A. F. Th. van der Heijden and Jan Siebelink, academics Peter Nicolaï, Ewald Engelen and Paul Cliteur and filmmaker Eddy Terstall.

The campaign is headed by Groningen provincial councillor Anja Hazekamp. The PvdD is not currently represented in the European parliament.

The PvdD’s European election manifesto (in English)


The touching moment was captured on
film. Photo: Stichting Ambulancewens


Question: Dear Kryon: I live in Spain. I am sorry if I will ask you a question you might have already answered, but the translations of your books are very slow and I might not have gathered all information you have already given. I am quite concerned about abandoned animals. It seems that many people buy animals for their children and as soon as they grow, they set them out somewhere. Recently I had the occasion to see a small kitten in the middle of the street. I did not immediately react, since I could have stopped and taken it, without getting out of the car. So, I went on and at the first occasion I could turn, I went back to see if I could take the kitten, but it was to late, somebody had already killed it. This happened some month ago, but I still feel very sorry for that kitten. I just would like to know, what kind of entity are these animals and how does this fit in our world. Are these entities which choose this kind of life, like we do choose our kind of Human life? I see so many abandoned animals and every time I see one, my heart aches... I would like to know more about them.

Answer: Dear one, indeed the answer has been given, but let us give it again so you all understand. Animals are here on earth for three (3) reasons.

(1) The balance of biological life. . . the circle of energy that is needed for you to exist in what you call "nature."

(2) To be harvested. Yes, it's true. Many exist for your sustenance, and this is appropriate. It is a harmony between Human and animal, and always has. Remember the buffalo that willingly came into the indigenous tribes to be sacrificed when called? These are stories that you should examine again. The inappropriateness of today's culture is how these precious creatures are treated. Did you know that if there was an honoring ceremony at their death, they would nourish you better? Did you know that there is ceremony that could benefit all of humanity in this way. Perhaps it's time you saw it.

(3) To be loved and to love. For many cultures, animals serve as surrogate children, loved and taken care of. It gives Humans a chance to show compassion when they need it, and to have unconditional love when they need it. This is extremely important to many, and provides balance and centering for many.

Do animals know all this? At a basic level, they do. Not in the way you "know," but in a cellular awareness they understand that they are here in service to planet earth. If you honor them in all three instances, then balance will be the result. Your feelings about their treatment is important. Temper your reactions with the spiritual logic of their appropriateness and their service to humanity. Honor them in all three cases.

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Danish zoo that killed Marius the giraffe puts down four lions

Copenhagen zoo says it has euthanised two old lions and two cubs to make way for a new male

The Guardian - AFP, Copenhagen, March 2014

Lions eating the remains of Marius the giraffe at Copenhagen zoo last
month. Photograph: Gonzales Photo/Demotix/Corbis

A Danish zoo that prompted international outrage by putting down a healthy giraffe and dissecting it in public has killed two lions and their two cubs to make way for a new male.

"Because of the pride of lions' natural structure and behaviour, the zoo has had to euthanise the two old lions and two young lions who were not old enough to fend for themselves," Copenhagen zoo said.

The 10-month-old lions would have been killed by the new male lion "as soon as he got the chance", it said.

The four lions were put down on Monday after the zoo failed to find a new home for them, a spokesman said. All four were from the same family.

He said there would be no public dissection of the animals since "not all our animals are dissected in front of an audience".

Within a few days the new male will be introduced to the zoo's two female lions, who have reached breeding age.

The zoo's chief executive, Steffen Straede, said: "The zoo is recognised worldwide for our work with lions, and I am proud that one of the zoo's own brood now forms the centre of a new pride of lions."

Last month the zoo's scientific director, Bengt Holst, received death threats over the decision to kill an 18-month-old giraffe, Marius, who was put down with a bolt gun before children were allowed to watch his body being chopped up, dissected and fed to lions.

The move shocked thousands of animal lovers around the world who had signed an online petition to save him. The zoo said on its website it had no choice but to prevent the animal attaining adulthood since under European Association of Zoos and Aquaria rules inbreeding between giraffes is to be avoided.

Many Danes were surprised and even angered by the international reaction to the event, with a leading expert on the ethics of the treatment of animals decrying the "Disneyfication" of zoo creatures.

Sunday, March 23, 2014

Myanmar’s Log Export Ban to Hurt Businessmen But Help Forests

Jakarta Globe, Jared Ferrie, Mar 23, 2014

An elephant pulls a teak log in a logging camp in Pinlebu township, Sagaing,
 northern Myanmar, in this picture taken March 6, 2014. (Reuters Photo/Soe Zeya Tun)

Yangon. Myanmar will ban the export of raw timber logs from April 1, choking off profits in a sector that provided critical funding to the country’s former military rulers for decades, as a new reformist government steps up efforts to save forests.

Myanmar has some of Asia’s largest remaining expanses of forests, from the slopes of Himalayan foothills in the north to steamy rainforest in the south.

But it has been disappearing fast.

Forest cover shrank almost a fifth, to 47 percent of land area in 2010, from 58 percent in 1990, Forestry Ministry data shows.

Total timber exports of 1.24 million cubic tonnes in the fiscal year to March 2013 brought in more than $1 billion in revenue, government figures show.

While timber remains an important income stream for Myanmar’s rulers after a quasi-civilian government took over from the military in 2011, it is not as critical as before.

To recognize Myanmar’s economic and political reforms, the European Union, the United States and other countries have eased or lifted sanctions, allowing foreign investment in sectors such as telecommunications.

The reforms are now reaching into the forestry sector, with the government ready to put conservation above profit.

The ban is likely to hurt the forestry industry, which generates about 90 percent of export earnings from raw logs and not finished products, said Barber Cho, head of the Myanmar Timber Merchants’ Association.

“Myanmar industry might suffer, some people might suffer,” said Barber Cho, whose group represents about 900 companies.

“It’s a difficult and complicated juncture for us.”

Under the new rule, revenues could plummet, forcing forestry firms to invest in new sawmills to stay competitive.

But the action was necessary, as the former junta had practiced “legal overproduction” that decimated Myanmar’s forests for decades, Barber Cho said.

Crippled by sanctions, chronic economic mismanagement and starved for hard currency, the generals gave logging concessions to their cronies to export raw logs in exchange for the cash needed to prop up their rule.

Forest products were the military junta’s second most important source of legal foreign exchange and exports earned $428 million in the fiscal year to March 2005, natural resources watchdog group Global Witness said.

Among the big companies involved in the business are Asia World, the Htoo Group, and Yuzana Co.

Htoo Group and Yuzana are the two biggest palm oil companies in the environmentally sensitive southern region of Tanintharyi.

Yuzana also runs a 81,000-hectare biofuel concession in the world’s largest tiger reserve in northern Kachin state, where the military has contracted with Asia World to build roads and dams, conservation group Forest Trends says.

“All these renowned companies were granted associated rights over timber extraction in their project area,” the Washington-based group said in a recent report.

Challenging the cronies

The ban, covering all kinds of trees, will end Myanmar’s status as the only country to export raw teak logs from natural forests rather than plantations. Exports of teak wood alone earned $359 million last year.

“Of course, this ban should have been imposed a long time ago, but it’s better late than never,” a forestry ministry official told Reuters.

“We believe it will help encourage wood-based industry and increase job opportunities,” added the official, who declined to be identified as he was not authorised to talk to media.

From next year, the government also plans to slash by 80 percent the amount of teak it allows to be taken from the forests, Barber Cho said.

How the cronies will fare is an open question, but it’s clear that Myanmar’s notoriously opaque timber industry has long been a key source of wealth for many prominent businessmen.

Tycoon Tay Za said his Htoo Group, engaged in businesses ranging from mining to tourism, grew from a humble start, based on a loan from his mother-in-law to set up a sawmill.

Tay Za said he did not exploit connections to win concessions, which were allotted through a bidding process, but he did say his father served with top figures in the military, including Than Shwe, who ruled Myanmar from 1992 to 2011, while Tay Za was building his business empire.

“It was a fair competition,” Tay Za said in a December interview. “No need to know the minister, only open competition.”

Groups such as Forest Trends and others familiar with the way the junta worked say tenders were for show. The real concessions were shared out in backroom deals.

“It was not a tender system, it was a negotiation system,” said Barber Cho.

Data shows one of Tay Za’s firms received a 270,000-hectare tract of rainforest in a proposed national park in Tanintharyi, one of Myanmar’s most biodiverse regions.

Tay Za logged almost two-thirds of another 65,000 hectares of nearby palm oil concessions awarded to him during the five years to fiscal 2007/8, data shows.

Tay Za, as well as representatives of Yuzana and Asia World, did not respond to requests for comment.

The log export ban will force dominant forestry companies to invest in new processes and diversify, said Aung Thura, of the Yangon-based research and consulting firm Thura Swiss.

“It will have an impact on them, but it won’t destroy them,” he said. “It’s in their interest to diversify, not just export raw logs.”

— Additional reporting by Aung Hla Tun in Yangon

Reuters

Friday, March 21, 2014

The moment a giraffe 'says goodbye' to a dying zoo worker

DutchNews.nl, Friday 21 March 2014

The touching moment was captured on film. Photo: Stichting Ambulancewens

A 54-year-old zoo worker suffering from terminal cancer was 'kissed' by a giraffe while on a visit to say goodbye to the animals whose pens he cleaned.

Mario was wheeled around the Blijdorp zoo in Rotterdam in his hospital bed thanks to the charity Ambulance Wish Foundation. While visiting the giraffes, one approached Mario and appeared to nuzzle him.

‘It was a very special moment. You saw him smile,’ the foundation’s director Kees Veldboer told the AD. ‘It was special that the animals knew him and could sense all was not well with him.’

Mario, who had learning difficulties, had worked at the zoo for most of his adult life.

Related Articles:

"Soul Communication" - Feb 22-23, 2014 (Kryon Channelling by Lee Carroll) - (Text version Part I)

“… Animals. You love them, don't you? What do you know about animals, especially the ones you care for and love, the ones you call pets? They have personalities, don't they? They can talk to you! When they communicate, what does that sound like, dear one? What do their voices sound like? "Well, Kryon, you already know they don't have an actual voice." Oh really? Then how do they "talk" to you? Now it gets good, doesn't it? They communicate through concepts. Their conceptual thought groups are available for you to pick up. So guess where you pick up these thoughts? It's through your pineal, which is the interpreter of multidimensional things in your body. It's not your brain, which is picking up their animal broadcasts, dear ones.

Now, some of you are good at this kind of communication. There are ones who are listening to this right now called animal whisperers, and they know exactly what I'm talking about. Why do they call it whispering? I give you my interpretation. It's because the communications are not linear, and they whisper to you through the pineal and not through brain synapse. It comes in thought groups, very softly and all at once, like the smudge. When you pick it up, you know what the dog or cat or horse or hamster or rabbit is trying to communicate. You know the requests they have, perhaps the distress they have, perhaps the celebration or the love they have.

Now, this kind of communication with animals is easy for you, because you all have felt this. I believe you know what I'm speaking about. So apply this lesson, for what I'm teaching today is no different and uses the same process you're going to use in real life and in meditation when you listen to God.

"Kryon, is it true that communicating with animals is soul communication?" Yes, it is theirs to yours, and if you're good at the interpretation of their thoughts, then why doubt yourself about the next step? Practice doing this communication with your own Higher-Self. Your Higher-Self is that part of yourself that vibrates higher than your cellular dimensionality, and it's part of your "soul group". This "soul group" is part of the nine attributes of the Human Being and is the core of you. It is the part that gives you information from the other side of the veil from that which you call God. …”


Kryon Q&A

Question: Dear Kryon: I live in Spain. I am sorry if I will ask you a question you might have already answered, but the translations of your books are very slow and I might not have gathered all information you have already given. I am quite concerned about abandoned animals. It seems that many people buy animals for their children and as soon as they grow, they set them out somewhere. Recently I had the occasion to see a small kitten in the middle of the street. I did not immediately react, since I could have stopped and taken it, without getting out of the car. So, I went on and at the first occasion I could turn, I went back to see if I could take the kitten, but it was to late, somebody had already killed it. This happened some month ago, but I still feel very sorry for that kitten. I just would like to know, what kind of entity are these animals and how does this fit in our world. Are these entities which choose this kind of life, like we do choose our kind of Human life? I see so many abandoned animals and every time I see one, my heart aches... I would like to know more about them.

Answer: Dear one, indeed the answer has been given, but let us give it again so you all understand. Animals are here on earth for three (3) reasons.

(1) The balance of biological life. . . the circle of energy that is needed for you to exist in what you call "nature."

(2) To be harvested. Yes, it's true. Many exist for your sustenance, and this is appropriate. It is a harmony between Human and animal, and always has. Remember the buffalo that willingly came into the indigenous tribes to be sacrificed when called? These are stories that you should examine again. The inappropriateness of today's culture is how these precious creatures are treated. Did you know that if there was an honoring ceremony at their death, they would nourish you better? Did you know that there is ceremony that could benefit all of humanity in this way. Perhaps it's time you saw it.

(3) To be loved and to love. For many cultures, animals serve as surrogate children, loved and taken care of. It gives Humans a chance to show compassion when they need it, and to have unconditional love when they need it. This is extremely important to many, and provides balance and centering for many.

Do animals know all this? At a basic level, they do. Not in the way you "know," but in a cellular awareness they understand that they are here in service to planet earth. If you honor them in all three instances, then balance will be the result. Your feelings about their treatment is important. Temper your reactions with the spiritual logic of their appropriateness and their service to humanity. Honor them in all three cases.