Robber fly - Nature photographer Thomas Shahan specializes in amazing portraits of tiny insects. It isn't easy. Shahan says that this Robber Fly (Holcocephala fusca), for instance, is "skittish" and doesn't like its picture taken.

Eye-popping bug photos

Nature by Numbers (Video)

"The Greater Akashic System" – July 15, 2012 (Kryon Channelling by Lee Caroll) (Subjects: Lightworkers, Intent, To meet God, Past lives, Universe/Galaxy, Earth, Pleiadians, Souls Reincarnate, Invention: Measure Quantum state in 3D, Recalibrates, Multi-Dimensional/Divine, Akashic System to change to new system, Before religion changed the system, DNA, Old system react to Karma, New system react to intent now for next life, Animals (around humans) reincarnate again, This Animal want to come back to the same human, Akashic Inheritance, Reincarnate as Family, Other Planets, Global Unity … etc.)

Question: Dear Kryon: I live in Spain. I am sorry if I will ask you a question you might have already answered, but the translations of your books are very slow and I might not have gathered all information you have already given. I am quite concerned about abandoned animals. It seems that many people buy animals for their children and as soon as they grow, they set them out somewhere. Recently I had the occasion to see a small kitten in the middle of the street. I did not immediately react, since I could have stopped and taken it, without getting out of the car. So, I went on and at the first occasion I could turn, I went back to see if I could take the kitten, but it was to late, somebody had already killed it. This happened some month ago, but I still feel very sorry for that kitten. I just would like to know, what kind of entity are these animals and how does this fit in our world. Are these entities which choose this kind of life, like we do choose our kind of Human life? I see so many abandoned animals and every time I see one, my heart aches... I would like to know more about them.

Answer: Dear one, indeed the answer has been given, but let us give it again so you all understand. Animals are here on earth for three (3) reasons.

(1) The balance of biological life. . . the circle of energy that is needed for you to exist in what you call "nature."

(2) To be harvested. Yes, it's true. Many exist for your sustenance, and this is appropriate. It is a harmony between Human and animal, and always has. Remember the buffalo that willingly came into the indigenous tribes to be sacrificed when called? These are stories that you should examine again. The inappropriateness of today's culture is how these precious creatures are treated. Did you know that if there was an honoring ceremony at their death, they would nourish you better? Did you know that there is ceremony that could benefit all of humanity in this way. Perhaps it's time you saw it.

(3) To be loved and to love. For many cultures, animals serve as surrogate children, loved and taken care of. It gives Humans a chance to show compassion when they need it, and to have unconditional love when they need it. This is extremely important to many, and provides balance and centering for many.

Do animals know all this? At a basic level, they do. Not in the way you "know," but in a cellular awareness they understand that they are here in service to planet earth. If you honor them in all three instances, then balance will be the result. Your feelings about their treatment is important. Temper your reactions with the spiritual logic of their appropriateness and their service to humanity. Honor them in all three cases.

Dian Fossey's birthday celebrated with a Google doodle

Dian Fossey's birthday celebrated with a Google doodle
American zoologist played by Sigourney Weaver in the film Gorillas in the Mist would have been 82 on Thursday (16 January 2014)

Monday, May 21, 2007

Green science: Biofuels and the Future of the environment

Arnawa Widagda, Contributor The Jakarta Post , Jakarta

The rising prices of petroleum fuel have pushed alternative fuels such as biodiesel and bioethanol into the spotlight. Despite their rising popularity, many seem to misunderstood what biofuel is.

Unlike traditional fossil-based fuels such as diesel and gasoline, biofuels are environmentally friendly, renewable fuel. As the name implies, biofuels are extracted from plants -- biodiesel is typically made from new or used vegetable oils and animal fats, while ethanol is made from any plant life rich in sugar, like corn and sugar cane.

Currently available biofuel offerings on the market use a blend of biodiesel or ethanol with traditional petroleum fuel. For example, biodiesel is typically made up of 20 percent biofuel and 80 percent petroleum, called B20 fuel. Bioethanol blends are made with 5 to 10 percent ethanol.

For its Bio Pertamax, Pertamina uses 5 percent of ethanol. In this sense, biofuels can be regarded as additives rather than replacements for fossil-based fuels such as petroleum.

However, much higher blends of biofuel exist that can be considered "real" alternatives for petroleum.

Neat biodiesel, or B100, is made entirely from biodiesel, while ethanol-based biofuels such as E85 and E95 use 85 percent and 95 percent ethanol, respectively.

Such high-level blends will certainly reduce significantly the world's dependence on fossil-based fuels; however, they are not without drawbacks.

Ethanol is much more corrosive and burns at lower combustion temperatures than traditional gasoline. The corrosive nature of ethanol and biodiesel means cars -- or engines in general -- must use additional protection to prevent damage to fuel-related systems if they use high biofuel blends.

With lower blends (10 percent for ethanol and 20 percent for biodiesel), engines and fuel systems do not need the additional protection. Due to its lower combustion temperature, gasoline engines still need a 15 percent blend of gasoline; otherwise, the engines will fail on a cold start.

However, diesel engines are much better suited for low-burn temperature fuel, making E95 a better choice for diesel engines.

It is also true that biofuel generally produces less energy than petroleum, meaning slightly lower mileage for users. This is because traditional gasoline and diesel engines are built without biofuels in mind.

Biodiesels have more oxygen content than traditional diesel, while ethanol-based biofuels have more octane but a lower combustion temperature. Biofuel-aware engines such as flexible fuel vehicle (FFV) engines in newer cars should have no problems with E85 for gasoline engines or in the case of biodiesel, neat biodiesel for diesel engines.

These two characteristics of biofuels actually have a positive effect -- a more efficient combustion, which means less pollution. So the use of biofuels should help the current energy crisis and even protect the environment.

Various studies show that neat biodiesel reduces carbon dioxide emissions by more than 75 percent compared to petroleum diesel. Using B20 biodiesel reduces carbon dioxide emissions by 15 percent.

Tests at the National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety at Colorado State University document a 25 to 30 percent reduction in carbon monoxide emissions when automobiles burn a 10 percent blend of ethanol.

Let's not forget the economic impact on farms and the national workforce.

The different characteristics of biofuels do present new challenges for distribution and storage.

Such facilities must be vigilant about water produced either from condensation due to cold weather or seepage. Rust, microbes and other deposits sticking to the insides of a fuel tank or container detach more easily with biofuel.

A high enough buildup will lead to blockage in fuel systems and failed starts in engines. Of course, this doesn't just affect cars and engines -- it also means fuel pumps and gas stations must invest in new pumps, storage tanks and other equipment.

In fact, Indonesia's entire fuel distribution pipeline will likely require an upgrade to be biofuel-ready.

Biofuel certainly has the potential to replace traditional petroleum -- a clean, renewable energy upon which we can all depend.

At this time, biofuel contribution to the country's energy consumption is still very small.

For biofuel to gain widespread use, the necessary infrastructure -- more FFVs on the market, upgraded biofuel-ready supply and distribution channels, including a quality standard on biofuels -- must be in place.

A paper written by Soni Solistia Wirawan and Armansyah H. Tambunan of the Agency for the Assessment and Application of Technology (BPPT) titled The Current Status and Prospects of Biodiesel Development also cites other necessary steps. These concern "how to accelerate the construction of new biodiesel plants, plantations as a key driver in the continuity of raw material, which is supported by committed government policy and regulation. This implies all biodiesel stakeholders should work harder for the success of the biodiesel program in Indonesia".

Such a project will likely be costly, but the rewards would be well worth the effort. Biofuels are not just a solution to our energy problem, but also a long-term environmental solution.

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